Journal articles: the early years

 

 

Bibliography Early Years 1914-1924 1920-31 Inter War Years Road to Victory'45 Labour's leadership

 

Keith Laybourn  

THE RISE OF THE LABOUR PARTY.
Modern History Review
  (1998) 10(1): pp.22-24.

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Reviews various interpretations of the rise of the British Labour Party.

James Thompson  

THE GENESIS OF THE 1906 TRADES DISPUTES ACT: LIBERALISM, TRADE UNIONS, AND THE LAW.
Twentieth Century British History
  (1998) 9(2): pp.175-200.

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The Trades Disputes Act of 1906 reversed the Taff Vale Decision of 1901 and restored trade unions' immunity from action for damages. The Liberals dropped own bill in favour of Labour's indicating an expression of support for the new Labour Party representation after the 1906 election.

Duncan Tanner  

THE DEVELOPMENT OF BRITISH SOCIALISM, 1900-1918.
Parliamentary History
(1997) 16(1): pp.48-66.

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Conventionally, most early-20th-century Labour politicians were nonideological liberals with an indigenous trade-union, Nonconformist, or "ethical socialist" background. In fact, prominent Labour figures such as Ramsay MacDonald, Philip Snowden, and George Lansbury developed intellectual constructs owing much to revisionist Marxism and other continental socialist influences. Labour Party intellectuals participated fully in the contemporary exchange of socialist ideas throughout the Western world. They were in the forefront on many issues, such as the changing nature of capitalism, the impact of technology, the role of voluntarism, and participatory citizenship. The Labour Party was in many ways more eclectic and adaptable than its European counterparts, which were more inhibited by entrenched Marxist positions.

Frank Trentmann

 

 

WEALTH VERSUS WELFARE: THE BRITISH LEFT BETWEEN FREE TRADE AND NATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY BEFORE THE FIRST WORLD WAR.

Historical Research  (1997) 70(171): pp.70-98.

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While leaders of the Labour Party opposed tariff reform based on concerns over its effect on food prices they did not share the optimistic Liberal view of free trade.

Michael Tichelar  

SOCIALISTS, LABOUR AND THE LAND: THE RESPONSE OF THE LABOUR PARTY TO THE LAND CAMPAIGN OF LLOYD GEORGE BEFORE THE FIRST WORLD WAR.
Twentieth Century British History
  (1997) 8(2): pp.127-144.

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The land question occupied a central place before 1914 in the policies of the Parliamentary Labour Party. Socialists in these parties idealized the virtues of rural life, were concerned about rural depopulation, and viewed "smallholdings" as a partial solution to unemployment. The PLP, however, resisted the ILP's "state-based" demand for outright land nationalization, preferring a system of devolved public ownership exercised democratically through district and parish councils.

Keith Laybourn  

THE RISE OF LABOUR AND THE DECLINE OF LIBERALISM: THE STATE OF THE DEBATE.
History
 (1995) 80(259): pp.207-226.

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Liberal revisionists have attempted to explain the demise of the Liberal Party and the rise of the Labour Party in terms of the cultural and social change wrought by World War I. They thus challenged the older class-based explanation, which held that the working class attached itself to the political ambitions of the Labour Party before 1914 via the trade union movement. The author suggests a balanced approach, one that acknowledges that the war was responsible for significant political and social change but recognizes that the Liberal Party was finding great difficulty in containing Labour's prewar challenge. The Liberals failed to appreciate the discontent that had existed among trade unionists from the mid-1880's. This neglect, combined with working-class anger and frustration, helped to produce an independent Labour movement.

 
W.C.Hancock  

NO COMPROMISE: NONCONFORMITY AND POLITICS 1893-1914.
Baptist Quarterly
  (1995) 36(2): pp.56-69.

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Examines nonconformity and the rise of Labour suggesting the link with theology is tenuous.

John Stewart  

RAMSAY MACDONALD, THE LABOUR PARTY, AND CHILD WELFARE, 1900-1914.
Twentieth Century British History
  (1993) 4(2): pp.105-125.

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Ramsay MacDonald, an evolutionary socialist, viewed the family as crucial to the development of socialist society. He saw capitalism as undermining both the family and the social discipline the latter inculcated. MacDonald criticized the Social Democratic Federation's policy of state-provided child maintenance as supplanting family responsibility with state control - a policy also playing into the hands of socialism's capitalist enemies. Consequently, MacDonald and most of the Parliamentary Labour Party leadership supported various legislation aimed at strengthening the working-class family as an accountable social unit.

Chris Wrigley  

WIDENING HORIZONS? BRITISH LABOUR AND THE SECOND INTERNATIONAL 1893-1905.
Labour History Review
 (1993) 58(1): pp.8-13.

Michael Klarman  

OSBORNE: A JUDGMENT GONE TOO FAR?

English Historical Review   (1988) 103(406): pp.21-39.

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Examines the history of the 1910 law suit brought by Walter V. Osborne, railway porter and branch secretary of the Amalgamated Society of Railway Servants, to prevent union levies for political campaigns.

Ross McKibbin  

WHY WAS THERE NO MARXISM IN GREAT BRITAIN?
English Historical Review
  (1984) 99(391): pp. 297-331.

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Questions why "Britain alone of the major European states produced no mass Marxist" in the years before World War I. Suggests that Britain was not a favourable environment because of the workforce structures (smaller units), associational life (hobbies, clubs) and that the working class did not feel excluded from society,

Trevor Fisher  

KEIR HARDIE & THE 1907 CONFERENCE: CRISIS IN THE LABOUR PARTY.
History Today
  (1983) 33 (June): pp.12-15.

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The decision in favour of universal suffrage at the Labour Party conference in 1907 ran into practical political problems involving Keir Hardie's leadership.

Henry Pelling  

THE POLITICS OF THE OSBORNE JUDGEMENT.
Historical Journal
  (1982) 25(4): pp.889-909.

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Considers some aspects of the judgments in and consequences of the Osborne case, concerning the political levy in trade unions, between 1907 and 1913.

A.W.Purdue  

GEORGE LANSBURY AND THE MIDDLESBROUGH ELECTION OF 1906.
International Review of Social History 
[Netherlands] (1973) 18(3): pp.333-352.

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The election of 1906 examined in relation to the problem of electoral alliance with Liberals and risking alienation of ILP.

P.F.Clarke  

BRITISH POLITICS AND BLACKBURN POLITICS, 1900-10.
Historical Journal
1969 12(2): 302-327.

Reveals that the Gladstone/MacDonald Pact also at work at the local level.

       
   

 

       

 

 

Journal articles: The Road to Victory'45 | Journal articles: The Inter War Years | Journal articles: Labour's leadership | Journal articles:  c.1924-31 | Journal articles: the rise of Labour | Journal articles: the early years | Wilson Years Bibliography | Early Days